The Coligny Calendar - was this Plato's 'Neolithic' Calendar?

In the author's earlier books in 1995 and 2002 and in two later articles the structure of the Neolithic lunisolar calendar was discussed, based on a reconstruction of the Gaulish 'Coligny Calendar' discovered in 1897. All the references to the books and papers may be found collected below.

To summarise, the incomplete 5-year lunisolar cycle of the Coligny calendar, as it has been reconstructed by specialists, can be reconstructed as a highly accurate 11-year lunisolar cycle when it is combined with a 6-year cycle. This idea of an alternating five-year and six-year period is identical to that mentioned in passing within Plato's Critias, who describes the ancient kings gathering together "every fifth and every sixth year alternately". Due to the constraints of real astronomy such a calendar can only work if it is based on a real 11-year lunisolar cycle.

Thus we may infer that the Calendar used by the Gaulish Druids had very ancient roots and gives us further reason to believe that a core of truth underlies the Atlantis narrative in Plato's Critias.

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 'The Neolithic calendar' ->

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'On the Coligny Calendar...' ->

Tags: Coligny calendar, Celtic calendar, Gaulish calendar, Druids, Druid calendar, Pliny, Plato, Plato Critias. Lunisolar calendar. 11-year cycle

Citations:

Dunbavin, Paul (2020) The Neolithic Calendar, in Prehistory Papers, pp 13-22, Third Millennium Publishing, Beverley, ISBN: 978-0-9525029-4-4 (a previously unpublished 2006 paper)

 

…and the publication of a related article in the C&C Review in 2018.

 

Dunbavin, Paul (2020) On the Coligny Calendar and the Calendar in Plato’s Critias, in Prehistory Papers, pp 23-30 Third Millennium Publishing, Beverley, ISBN: 978-0-9525029-4-4 Dunbavin, Paul (2018)

 

On the Coligny Calendar and the Calendar in Plato’s Critias, in Chronology & Catastrophism REVIEW, 2018:2 pp 50-53

Paul Dunbavin & Third Millennium Publishing, November 2019, V1.1